About the Desert Tortoise Preserve Committee

The Desert Tortoise Preserve Committee is a non-profit organization formed in 1974 to promote the welfare of the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) in its native wild state. Committee members share a deep concern for the continued preservation of the tortoise and its habitat in the southwestern deserts.

Our Mission

The Desert Tortoise Preserve Committee is dedicated to the recovery and conservation of the Desert Tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) and other rare and endangered species inhabiting the Mojave and western Sonoran deserts.

We accomplish our mission through:

  • Land Acquisition & Stewardship: acquiring, protecting, and restoring lands to support recovery of the desert tortoise, Mojave ground squirrel, burrowing owl and rare plants.
  • Education: increasing awareness and understanding of desert tortoises, their natural habitat, and human activities impacting their populations.
  • Research: promoting studies of the biology, habitat, and history of the desert tortoise and other rare species.
  • Collaboration: working with organization members and donors, State and Federal government agencies, as well as community stakeholders to support the recovery and restoration of desert tortoises and the ecosystem in which they inhabit.

Our Vision

Desert Tortoises were once common throughout the Mojave and Sonoran deserts. Over the past century, the population has rapidly decreased due to human activity. The Desert Tortoise Preserve Committee, Inc. is working to reverse this trend in hopes that there will once again be stable populations of Desert Tortoises found throughout their geographic range.

How You Can Help

The Desert Tortoise Preserve Committee, Inc. relies on support from its members and donors. Without this support, the hard work needed to implement Desert Tortoise conservation would not be possible. If you would like to help protect Desert Tortoises, Donate or Become a Member today! You can also learn more about the Human Impacts and Natural Problems which are contributing to the Desert Tortoise population decline.

 

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